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Bangor

Bangor

Bangor is a relatively small town in North Wales with a population as small as nearly 20,000 people. A relatively large proportion of the population are students, with one third of them are studying in the city...

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Bristol

Bristol

Bristol is the largest city in England and the eighth is located near the River Avon in the border districts of Bath and North East Somerset Drive, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire, South West of England...

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Dundee

Dundee

Dundee is located in eastern Scotland. Had an estimated population of 145,463 in 2001 and its population density was 2,424 inhabitants per km ², which is relatively high. It has a total area of 60 kms and is ranked ...

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Lisburn

Lisburn

Lisburn is located in the county of Northern Ireland from County Antrim, located in the eastern part of Northern Ireland. Its name in Irish Lios na gCearrbhac. It has a population of about 110,000 and a population...

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Recommended Tours

Lincoln Cathedral

Lincoln-Cathedral

 

Lincoln Cathedral, Minster and Lincoln, which is also called, dates back to 1072 when William the Conqueror that the diocese learned of this, then the largest diocese in England (which covers the land between the Thames and Humber) must be moved from Dorchester, near Oxford, to Lincoln, where he had already established a castle in the old Roman town above. The first Norman bishop of Lincoln, Remigius had been a Benedictine monk, and a loyal supporter of William at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 the cathedral was finally consecrated in 1092nd He dominated the landscape since Lincoln and is an important landmark in many parts of Lincolnshire. Much of the original Norman cathedral was damaged by fire in 1141 about the time of the civil war between Stephen and Mathilda. Alexander "the Magnificent" (bishop from 1123 to 1148) was able to partially restore the architectural style using the most advanced of its time. His contributions include commssioning the famous 12th century Romanesque frieze on the western front. In 1185 an earthquake caused structural damage that has been corrected in St Hugh (Bishop 1186-1200) from 1192 onwards. He called himself took part in an architectural work, but his death prevented him from seeing the complete result of his plans, because a large transept and the nave were incomplete. St Hugh represented the beginning of the Gothic style of architecture, which was quite different than is the continent that became known as English Gothic. Gothic architecture appealed to the three structural devices: pointed arches (not round ones), vaults and pillars of flight. These may be the most sweeping roofline extends, and to reach a much higher altitude, which allowed the building to cover a much larger space, and obtain large windows, lots of windows and light.